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tonight, first ladies, influence and image. a look at jane pierce and harriet lane. followed by president obama, vice president biden, and former congresswoman gabrielle giffords. -- paying tribute to her congressional aide, gabe zimmerman. later, al sharpton's action network annual convention. >> probably the most tragic of all our first ladies. she hated the office. hated it with a passion. ,> they took to the white house they had eight rooms they had to furnish. >> but she spent much of her time writing letters. to her dead son. in her great grief she called him, my precious child, i must write to you even though you are never to see it or know it. a very poignant letter written by a grieving mother. >> they were on a train and there was a terrible accident. >> the train ride was very devastating for the family. an axelrod broke on the train and benny did not survive the crash. >> she concluded that this was god's judgment. that the loss of her son was god's punishment. >> the house was too much for her to take care of. i don't think she was interested in housekeeping part
the buchanan administration. we're going to introduce you to harriet lane who just at the age of 27 joined her uncle, james buchanan, who is our only bachelor president, in the white house, to serve as official hostess. she was well-educated and well-traveled and she became a popular figure in an otherwise tenuous time in a country on the brink of civil war and we'll tell you more about her in this video. >> harriet lane is a unique figure. she was 27 years old and the niece of our only bachelor president, james buchanan. >> we have a small dog that was not a play thing owned by miss lane but rather created to look like her when she was a first lady. >> she had been well-trained and learned discretion from her diplomat uncle and one of harriet's great admirers was queen victoria. >> this was a gift the queen gave harriet, a beautiful gold bracelet and inside it has her name, harriet lane, and the date of 1857 when she received the gift. the delegation came to the white house in 1860 and they came bearing all types of gifts, beautiful little shoes, paper folded objects, origami, little dictiona
popular that she sets trends in clothing and children and ships are named after her. meet harriet lane. we'll look at her life and that of her predecessor, jane pierce, along with your questions and comments by phone, facebook, and twitter, "first ladies," machine night, live at 9:00 eastern on c-span and c-span3, also on c-span radio and c-span.org. >> this morning, reuters correspondent jeff mason and usan ferrechio discuss the senate, and the grown-up coming immigration bill. and then we look at the backlog of claims at the department of veterans affairs. and later, scott snyder from the counon
at her life and that of her predecessor. -- harriet lane. atst ladies come tonight 9:00 eastern on c-span and c- span3. also, on c-span radio and c- span.org. >> this morning, adam green talked about the budget request president obama released last week and cuts to entitlement programs like social security in medicare. then, roger wicker takes your question about the budget, gun- control, and the situation on the korean peninsula.
and harriet lane. both of our guests have books available l where you can read more about these first ladies. one is "remembering the ladies," and "first ladies an intimate portrait of the women who shaped america." thank you to both of you for being with us, and thank you to all of you for being our audience this evening. ♪ 6 >> our series of first ladies continues next week. we will look at mary todd lincoln. we will travel to her childhood home of lexington, kentucky. watch next monday live at 9:00 p.m. eastern. and our website has more about the first ladies, including a special section, "welcome to the white house" produced by our partner, the white house historical association which chronicles life in the executive mansion during the tenure of each of the first ladies. with the association, we are offering a special edition of the book "first ladies of the united states of america" presenting a bog if i and pour -- biography and pour trait -- pportrait of each first lady. >> c-span, created by america's cable company's in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television pr
, dies in a train derailment before president pierce is inaugurated. then harriet lane, the adopted niece of james buchanan. although president buchanan is ranked by most historians as a failure, harriet's tenure as official white house hostess is wildly popular. after years of schooling and entertaining while her uncle served as a u.s. ambassador to great britain only 27 when she comes to live at 1600 pennsylvania avenue to become first lady. jane pierce and harriet lane. on "first ladies" live monday night at 9:00 a.m. on c-span and c-span 3 and c-span radio nd c-span.org. our web site has more about the first ladies including a special section welcome to the white house. produced by our partner the white house historical association. which chronicles life in the executive mansion during the tenure of each of the first ladies. and with the association we're offering a special edition of the book first ladies of the united states of america. presenting a biography and portrait of each first lady. comments from noted historians. and thoughts from michelle obama on the role of first ladies
. she dressed well, and she had a lot of friends. >> did harriet lane play an instrument. which one? >> are believed she played the played- i believe she the piano. an appropriation from congress. he supplemented because they liked to entertain so much a very good >> i do not know if he got an appropriation. budget not for entertainment -- there was not a budget for entertainment during good >> region for entertainment. >> was he trying to bring together the north and south? >> absolutely. >> was he successful? >> i do not think anything was successful. asused it as effectively just about anybody else should. the white house glittered. >> the next as a caller from vancouver, washington. september my daughter and a friend and i visited the buchanan house. one thing we learned about was the endowment. my daughter was like, this has been resting for years. but was fun. it was obvious why harriet lane was interested in so many things. it was not clear why she had such an advocacy for native americans. i wonder if you could shed light on that. >> i do not think she showed any particular
ladies, influence and image. a look at jane pierce and harriet lane. followed by president obama, vice president biden, and former congresswoman gabrielle giffords. -- paying tribute to her congressional aide, gabe zimmerman. later, al sharpton's action network annual convention. >> probably the most tragic of all our first ladies. she hated the office. hated it with a passion. ,> they took to the white house they had eight rooms they had to furnish. >> but she spent much of her time writing letters. to her dead son. in her
for this program on jane pierce first and harriet lane. both of our guests have books available l where you can read more about these first ladies. one is "remembering the ladies," and "first ladies, an intimate portrait of the women who shaped america." fork you to both of you being with us, and thank you to all of you for being our audience this evening. ♪ [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> next week, mary todd lincoln. in remains a central figure our country's history. she was a political partner to or has been endured a loss of three of for four sons. -- her four son. we will travel to her childhood home in lexington, ky. the lincoln cottage here in washington, d.c., where she spent time with their family during the tumultuous years of the lincoln presidency. eastern on at 9:00 c-span and c-span 3 and on c- span radio and c-span.org. our website has more about the first ladies, including a special section, welcome to the white house. it chronicles life in the executive mansion during the tenure of each of the
pearce, and harriet lane, the niece of president james buchanan. time in the white house has to do with grief, with the killing of her sons, one in a train derailment. harriet lane, the first woman referred to as first lady, who was a first-class hostess and a strong lobbyist for native american rights. though popular, she was branded a southern sympathizer leading up to the civil war. more on jayne pearce and harriet lane at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span, c-span3, and c-span.org. and our website has more about the first ladies, including a special section, welcome to the white house, produced by our partner, chronicling life in the white house during the tenure of each of the first ladies, and we are offering a special edition of the book of the first ladies of the united states of america, featuring a biography, comments from noted historians, and bought from michelle obama on noted force ladies in history. $12.95 s c-span.org/products. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as the public service by your television provider. julie doyle and josh reddic
" on a regular basis. beat harriet lane, a look at her life, and that of her predecessor, gene per se, along with your questions and comments. tonight on c-span and c-span3. patreaus ly general thought his private communications were going to remain private. we should all have that reasonable expectation that when we are communicating with one person we are not communicating with the government. we are not laying out our whole life to the government. we should have that privacy. >> we want a government to be trustworthy but we do not want to see the american people ever trust the government. pass laws to protect people's privacy and their fourth amendment rights rather than say -- or the courts may come in and save the day. while we are here why don't we make to the law catches up. >> does the government need a warrant to read your e-mail is? tonight on "the communicators." journal,"gton continues. host: start off by telling us what your group is about. national are a grassroots organization. we have 1 million members. reduced 50% in electorial work. our basic theory of change is if we work
it was the domain of. admired-- harriet lane, for her social skills even though the country was fracturing. >> historian catherine clinton said that in one of her biographies, she broke the elite virginia scheme of things. wivesof the congressional at some of the women that were very important during the virginian times were resentful. they lampooned them. lincoln and her. the sad thing was, she was a very intelligent and highly educated woman from the family in terms of what you consider wealthy and good families. but they treated her very badly. the other thing that might have hit her is that washington was a swamp. >> in many ways. itwhen i came to washington, was mosquito-ridden. that was not 150 years ago. i am sure she had a difficult time dealing with that. she complained about how drab and worn the white house itself was. some of the furniture was back to the days of dolly madison. she had a lot to worry about. >> if you think of the repercussions of this woman arriving from kentucky, referred to as the republican queen, mocked by people that do not know her and willing to assume t
derailment. we'll see how that affected her life and her husband's presidency. harriet lane was a frequent hostess, a fashion trendsetter, and a strong lobbyist for native american rights. on more on jane pierce and , live monday at 9:00 p.m. eastern. our website has more about the first ladies, including a special section, welcome to the white house. it chronicles life in the executive mansion during the tenure of the to the first ladies. we are offering a special edition of the book, first ladies of the united states of america, presenting a biography and portrait of each first lady. for theailable discounted price of $12.95 plus shipping that c- span.org/products. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> up next, remarks from former secretary of state and first lady hillary clinton. obama was in connecticut today, talking about gun violence and gun legislation. you can watch our first lady's program again tonight at midnight eastern. >> in a speech friday, elrich lynn talked about women's education and bu
ladies jane pierce and harriet lane. republican senator rand paul talks to students at howard university. then a conversation with iowa .enator chuck grassley later a confirmation hearing for president obama's choice to lead the white house budget office. the senate has been discussing gun legislation this week. there will be a procedural vote thursday to advance the bill. we spoke with a reporter earlier about the measure. >> the correspondent with the "national journal" it was announced the expanded background check proposal. what should we know about it? >> it creates a lot of buzz in the senate, which is interesting to watch. -- is different from the porme the proposal that was introduced by the senator of new york because it is not an universal background check. it mandates background checks for gun purchases at gun shows and over the internet. it is not mandating a background check if i'm going sell you a gun. >> what motivated the senators, a democrat and a republican to work together on this compromise? >> it could be any number of reasons. 91% of the public, i think is the lates
her. meet harriet lane. we will look at her life and that of her predecessor, jane pierce, along with your questions and comments by phone, facebook, and twitter. monday night, live at 9:00 eastern. saturday, on american history tv, a chance to weigh in live on emancipation and civil rights him and the role of corporations in american life in both panels from the organization of american historians annual meeting from san francisco. it starts at nine: 30 a.m. eastern with a look at the history of the black freed me from -- movement am a followed by your questions and calls. then at noon, a debate on the role of corporations in american life. that is also followed by your questions live at 1:30. , saturday,fe starting at 9:30 a.m. eastern on c-span's american history tv. "washington journal" continues. host: ed o'keefe is a congressional reporter for the "washington post." what is the significance of thursday's vote? caller: the senate is going to talk. -- guest: the senate is going to talk. a debate will begin tuesday afternoon on a series of measures. he will start with the big
madison is the second from the right with her turbine. and we have an opportunity here to see harriet lane, served as white house hostess later on. dollyarah polk and madison and james k. polk. photography as a political tool, how do politicians abrb this new technology and begin to use it for their benefit? >> they are just beginning to figure this out. you really don't get it until the 1850's and maybe the 1860 election when photography is everywhere. now it is almost a novelty. it is not all that terrific. you have to sit for a long time. it is not a single shot in the picture is there. you have to sit there rigidly and not move while the photograph is being taken. towarde moving photography. much more important than photography is the very sophisticated line of type and art in newspapers. you have wonderful campaign posters being done. when polk runs, currier of currier and ives does a campaign poster for his opponent. with a picture of henry clay. they are using that kind of technology. photography you probably want to save for the fillmore's and beyond. knownalso have the first phot
and ships are named after her. meet harriet lane. we will look at her life and that of her predecessor, jane pierce, along with their questions and comments by phone, facebook, and twitter. at 9:00adies" tonight eastern on c-span. also on c-span radio and at c- span.org. >> certainly, general petraeus thought that his private communications were going to remain private. we all should have that reasonable expectation that when we are communicating with one person, we are not communicating with the government. we are not laying out our whole life to the government. we should have that privacy. >> we want the government to be trustworthy, but we do not want to say the american people, trust government. againstyour defense being abused. as we see new problems, you should pass laws to protect people's privacy and their fourth amendment rights, rather than saying, the government has not abused those yet -- why are you concerned? or the courts may come in and save the day. they might, but while we are here, why don't we make sure that the law catches up with the fourth amendment? >> does the govern
.org/first ladies. and tune in monday for jane pierce and harriet lane. >> talk about some of the people of the movement. who were the people who most moved things? was it came, malcolm x, the death of mr. evers, carmichael, john lewis? >> all of the above. all of them had different roles in the movement. one of the ways in which i tried to explain to students is that rosa parks made martin luther king possible. martin luther king did not make rosa parks possible. if she had not done what she did by refusing to give up her seat on that montgomery bus, martin luther king would have simply been an articulate, well- meaning baptist minister. it is because the rosa parks that we are talking about him today. she opened up the possibility for him to display those qualities that he had and to rise to the occasion. >> this weekend, stanford university professor labor and carson joins other civil rights historians at the organization for american historians annual meeting in san francisco. all of the panel, professor carson takes your questions live. it arts saturday at 9:30 a.m. eastern on east
trends in clothing and children and ships were named after her. meet harriet lane. we will look at her life and her predecessor, along with your comments. first ladies, monday night live at 9:00 a.m. eastern on c-span and c-span three and also on c- span radio and www.c-span.org. "washington journal" continues. host: i want to introduce you to representative hakeem jeffries, a freshman member, a democrat from new york. representative jeffries, where is your district? guest: eighth congressional district, largely anchored in brooklyn, downtown brooklyn neighborhoods like bedford stuyvesant, linden hills, east new york, and then several neighborhoods in the southern part of brooklyn that were hit hard by superstorm sandy, including on the island, brighton beach, seagate, manhattan beach, and then a few neighborhoods in queens, in and around jamaica bay, howard beach, and ozone park area host: you took of the office town seat? guest: formally represented in large measures by him the previous 30 years. anthony wiener is considering running for mayor of your hometown. what do you think? gue
popular that she has friends in clothing and his and ships are named after her. meet harriet lane. we will look at her life and that of her predecessor, jane pierce. along with your questions and comments by phone, facebook, and twitter. first ladies, monday nights at 9:00 eastern on c-span and c- span three. also on c-span radio and c- span.org. >> "washington journal" continues. host: joining us now is dr. patrician quinn from the national center for girls with adhd and serves as their director. thank you for serving us. what is adhd? guest: a chemical disorder that usually starts in childhood that may persist into adulthood and is comprised of a set of says -- symptoms. it usually involves trouble paying attention, distractibility. they may also include hyperactivity impulsivity, but it is not and everyone with the disorder. it is usually also genetically and heritage, so we see other family members with similar problems. we also see that there are other conditions, usually the result of insult during pregnancy or later on neck and also mimic or look like the same symptoms in adhd.
popular that she has friends in clothing, and children and ships are named after her. meet harriet lane. we will look at her light -- at her life and her predecessor, jane pierce. first ladies, monday night live at 9:00 eastern on c-span and c- span three. also on c-span radio and c- span.org. >> we like to think it is an important book in the sense that it tells you how the course works. there are so few good books out there that explain what is the process, how do they go about this, how do they decide be cases, what are they saying to one another. we see cases where the court is split 5-4. what do they really think? to their personal feelings get into it? it is a book about capital punishment and how the book -- the courts operate. >> we dig into the memoranda, theand forth between justices, and a lot of stuff is available. i was just fascinated by the human side of it. haveny cases, justices reservations about capital honest men meant. >> abc news veterans martin clancy and tim o'brien on the capital punishment cases that have defined the supreme court. tonight at 9:00 on "afterword
that the first lady in here it was the domain of. harriet lane, admired for her social skills even though the country was fracturing. >> historian catherine clinton said that in one of her biographies, she broke the elite virginia scheme of things. many of the congressional wives at some of the women that were very important during the virginian times were resentful. they lampooned them. lincoln and her. the sad thing was, she was a very intelligent and highly educated woman from the family in terms of what you consider wealthy and good families. but they treated her very badly. the other thing that might have hit her is that washington was a swamp. >> in many ways. >> when i came to washington, it was mosquito-ridden. that was not 150 years ago. i am sure she had a difficult time dealing with that. she complained about how drab and worn the white house itself was. some of the furniture was back to the days of dolly madison. she had a lot to worry about. >> if you think of the repercussions of this woman arriving from kentucky, referred to as the republican queen, mocked by people that do
of. harriet lane, admired for her social skills even though the country was fracturing. >> historian catherine clinton said that in one of her biographies, she broke the elite virginia scheme of things. many of the congressional wives at some of the women that were very important during the virginian times were resentful. they lampooned them. lincoln and her. the sad thing was, she was a very intelligent and highly educated woman from the family in terms of what you consider wealthy and good families. but they treated her very badly. the other thing that might have hit her is that washington was swamp. >> in many ways. >> when i came to washington, was mosquito-ridden. that was not 150 years ago. i am sure she had a difficult time dealing with that. she complained about how drab and worn the white house itself was. some of the furniture was back to the days of dolly madison. she had a lot to worry about. >> if you think of the repercussions of this woman arriving from kentucky, referred to as the republican mocked by people that do not know her and willing to assume the worst about t
and banks. then, focusing on the lives of jane pierce and harriet lane. later, that -- president obama, vice president biden, and deborah giffords late -- pay tribute to her congressional aide, gave zimmerman. >> this week on "the communicators," a look at cyber attacks and critical infrastructure. in the state of the union address president obama said our enemies are seeking the ability to set the touch up our grid, financial institutions, traffic control stwe have reprel three of those industries. gentlemen, i want to start with an opening question for each of you. what are some of the attacks that have happened on your industry and how are you preventing them? we begin with tom kuhn of the edison electric institute, which represents several electric companies in the united states. everyfar -- we get pings day from various sources, but so far the major attacks we have had have been on customer information systems or things of that nature. they have not been attacks that keep me up at night, which are the ones that would do some damage to our critical infrastructure. >> how do you work to p
-span.org/first lady. tune in monday for first ladies jane pierce and harriet lane. >> senator rand paul spoke to students at howard university. he talked about his party's history of opposing slavery. howard university is a historically black college founded after the civil war. senator paul also took questions after this 50-minute event. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. would like to thank the president and the faculty and the students letting me come today. people ask me are you nervous about speaking at the university, some of the students may be democrats? my response is the trip will be a success if i can get the hilltop to have a headline that says a republican came to howard but he came in peace. my wife asked me last week, she said do you have doubts, do you have doubts about trying to advance a message for an entire country? the truth is sometimes. when i do have doubts i think of a line from t.s. elliott. a line that says how should i presume to spit out the butt ends of my ways. when i think of how political enemies twist my ways i think of those words, when i'm pinned on presum
harriet lane. we'll look at that of her life and her predecessor, jane pearce. first ladies, tonight live at 9 eastern on c-span and c-span3. also on c-span radio and c-span.org. >> documentary film maker ken burns recently spoke at the national press club about his latest project called "the central park five." it tells the story of five be african-american and latino teenagers who were wrongly convicted of raping a female jogger in new york city's central park in 1989. the documentary premieres tomorrow on pbs. this runs about an hour. [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon and welcome to the national press club. my name is angela, i'm a reporter for bloomberg news and the 106th president of the national press club. we are the world's leading professional organization for journalists committed to our profession's future through programming we sveltes such as this while fostering a free press worldwide. for more information please visit your web site at press.org to donate to programs offered to the public through our national press club journalism institute, please visit press.org/
and ships are named after her. meet harriet lane. a look at her life and that of her predecessor, jane pierce, along with your questions and comments by phone, facebook, and twitter. c-ight at 9:00 eastern on span and c-span 3, also c-span radio and c-span.org. >> certainly general petraeus thought his private communications were going to remain private. we all should have reasonable expectations that when we are communicating with one person we are not communicating with the government. and we are not laying out our whole life to the government. we should have that privacy. >> if we want a government to be trustworthy but do not want to say to the american people, trust the government. that is your defense against being abused. as you see new problems we should pass laws to protect people's privacy and their fourth amendment rights rather than say the government has not abused as yet, why are you concerned? or the courts maye
's the first to be called first lady on the regular basis. she sets trends in clothing. meet harriet lane. the look at her life and her predecessor. along be your questions and comments. first lady monday night live at 9:00 eastern on c-span and c-span 3 and c-span radio and c-span.org. you're watching c-span2. you can see past programs and get our schedule on our website. you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >>> spoke in washington earlier this week about the oil production. she talked about the proposed keystone x l pipeline and earth to address climate change. it was interrupted by protesters. from the bookings institution. this is just over an hour. [inaudible] [inaudible conversations] good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. we thank you for coming today. we're delighted to have the allison red ford here as our guest today. we're delighted that the ambassador and distinguished member of the canadian government and the albert that government here to join us. i'm going to introduce who needs no introduction. she is the chairman of our advisory board for the energy secu
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28